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KILKIS IN
THE SHADOW OF WAR

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KILKIS IN
THE SHADOW OF WAR

In late 1916, the Macedonian Front extended across 360 kilometres, from the Strymonas river and Orfano gulf in the east to Korçë in the west.

In June 1917, during a politically tense climate of polarisation and internal conflict (National Schism) between the royalist government of Athens and the Provisional Government of National Defence in Thessaloniki under the leadership of Eleftherios Venizelos, the initially "favourably neutral" state of Greece joined the Macedonian Front on the side of the Entente.

The majority of military operations took place in the Kilkis region, where the Allied forces gradually arrived, starting in 1915 and culminating in 1917 and 1918.

In September 1918, a victorious counterattack was unleashed by the Allies, forcing the defeated forces to gradually capitulate, starting with Bulgaria in September 1918, Turkey one month later and ending with Germany and Austria-Hungary on 11 November 1918.

02/1

TOWARDS THE FRONT

02/2

AT THE CAMPS

02/3

LANDSCAPE IN FLAMES

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LIFE IN THE WAR TRENCHES

Trenches were a military practice integrally linked to the experience of the Great War that was also called “Trench Warfare”.

The trenches were dug as long narrow channels, usually barely deeper than the height of a human body, along great lengths within the ground, as underground tunnels that often connected to each other.

These provided the soldiers with shelter, protecting them from enemy fire.

Confined inside the trenches for months, soldiers were suffering not only by the painful anxiety waiting for an attack, by inhuman living conditions, such as the exposure in extreme weather changes and in absolutely unsanitary conditions, but also by illness and unbearable psychological pain.